Explain Why the Larger Waves Seen on the Oscilloscope?

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Murray Slovick
Administrator at - OscilloscopeTools

Being an Electrical engineer, Murray never limits himself with the job he’s doing. He constantly explores new branches of technology that are relevant to his...Read more

The ability to sit and stand every day is something we take for granted, not knowing that it actually involves several different muscles and moving pieces. Certainly, muscle contraction is essential for body movement. However, while skeletal muscles can be resuscitated before contraction is complete, cardiac muscles have to be completely relaxed before resuscitation.

Ventricular contractions refer to heartbeat rhythms created in the ventricles and interrupt the normal heart’s rhythm. The heart fills more blood into the ventricles making stronger pulses and when connected to an oscilloscope, it displays larger waves.

In this article, we explain wave summation and its cause and explain Why the Larger Waves Seen on the Oscilloscope Represent Ventricular Contraction. Keep reading to find out more.

What Is A Wave Summation?

Wave summation is an upsurge of the contraction of muscle strength depending on how fast a specific muscle is stimulated. It is the combination of feedback from a motor unit with multiple stimuli rapidly applied to it. A muscle’s motor unit uses a simple twitch feedback to respond to a single stimulus.

What Is A Wave Summation

When a second stimulus is quickly applied to the motor just before the feedback to the first stimulus is lost, the two feedbacks merge to form a greater muscle tension than one formed by single feedback. If stimulation continues, the merger of the individual feedbacks might cause tetanus.

What Causes Wave Summation?

When muscles are unable to relax when stimulated, contractile forces accumulate over time. The greater the wave summation generally, the faster and more consistently a muscle is activated. Tetanus occurs when muscles are stimulated fast and without rest, resulting in a smooth, continuous contraction.

As a result of calcium accumulation within the muscles, high wave summation enhances muscular contraction strength. Calcium stays in the sarcoplasm rather than being eliminated after fast muscle activation. The calcium in the sarcoplasm really rises after several muscle stimulations. More stronger contractions are associated with higher calcium levels in muscle tissue. Calcium improves the strength of muscular contractions by activating the muscle’s cross-bridges.

The motor unit summation affects muscle contraction as well. A neuron and each muscle fiber that is coupled to it make up the motor unit. Every muscle cell linked to the motor unit contracts in response to a nerve impulse traveling via the axon of a neuron. Stronger contractions are obtained by motor unit summation, which stimulates large muscular motor units.

Why the Larger Waves Seen on the Oscilloscope Represent Ventricular Contraction

The oscilloscope accepts signals from a connected device and displays feedback in a waveform on its screen. The larger waves seen on the oscilloscope represent ventricular contraction since the heart ventricles are much stronger compared to the atria.

Explain Why the Larger Waves Seen on the Oscilloscope

During ventricular contraction, a greater force is required to pump blood as opposed to atrial contraction. This means, more force is used to provide systemic blood circulation to the entire body. Smaller waves indicate atrial contraction.

Conclusion

Oscilloscopes can show an immeasurable number of waveforms. All you need to do is supply it with a signal that changes with time. If you have read this article, you understand why larger waves seen on the oscilloscope represent ventricular contraction.

We hope you found this article informative. Remember, the muscle contraction of ventricles has a much stronger force since they pump blood throughout the entire body; thus, they create larger waves on an oscilloscope.

Being an Electrical engineer, Murray never limits himself with the job he’s doing. He constantly explores new branches of technology that are relevant to his field. Besides his profession, he’s a hobbyist blogger, and researcher. He creates this site “Oscilloscopetools” because he wants to share his expertise about oscilloscope tools with a broader audience who don’t have much knowledge about these tools.

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